ACUPUNCTURE

Acupuncture is a treatment strategy that involves placing needles at specific points in the body to alleviate pain, promote healing, and improve function. Acupuncture treatment originated in ancient China roughly 3000 years ago, but today, acupuncture is now widely practiced in the west and is becoming a widely utilized treatment to address pain and injuries. Dr. Jason Williams DC is board certified in acupuncture by the state of North Carolina and uses western and sports based acupuncture techniques in our Cary chiropractic clinic.

What Conditions can be Treated with Acupuncture?

At AccessHealth, our practice primarily focuses on neuro-musculoskeletal pain and injuries, and acupuncture is often an important part of our treatment strategy.  Treatment can be incredibly effective at reducing and eliminating pain as well as getting you back to doing the things you enjoy.  Acupuncture for back pain and acupuncture for sciatica are some of the most common treatments we perform at our chiropractic and acupuncture clinic, but we also use traditional acupuncture to address a number of other conditions. Even if you’re experiencing something as simple as tightness, tension, and muscular discomfort, acupuncture can bring quick and effective relief.

Acupuncture Needles and Does Acupuncture Hurt?

Patients are often surprised when I show them acupuncture needles for the first time. If you have needle phobia or dislike needles when you’re getting blood drawn, you’ll be relieved when you see acupuncture needles. Acupuncture needles are filiform needles, in other words, they don’t have a hollow center like needles used to draw blood. Needles for acupuncture treatment come in a variety of sizes and styles but are generally much thinner than a hypodermic needle as well.

The next questions patients have about acupuncture treatment is “Does acupuncture hurt?” The good thing about using thin filiform needles is that it makes needling a lot less uncomfortable.  In fact, patients sometimes don’t even feel when I insert the acupuncture needle, and can’t tell whether the acupuncture needle is still in them or has been taken out because it’s so thin.  Needle technique affects how much the patient feels the needle as well. Dr. Jason Williams has over 250 hours of education in needling and needling technique and is able to modify treatments based on how comfortable his patient is with needles.

How Long Does Acupuncture Take?

Acupuncture is not a one-time fix for any issue, although I’ve had patients who have had a huge positive change in their symptoms after the first visit.  When a patient asks me “How long does acupuncture take?” I typically tell them that everyone is different, but let’s start with a trial of acupuncture treatment first.  This means the provider lays out a brief plan of visits, to see how the patient responds to care. Your trial of care will include acupuncture but frequently includes other therapies and a home exercise program as well. It’s hard to tell how long acupuncture takes to work, but a good guide is that the longer the problem has bothered you the longer it may take to respond to care.